Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Ten Second Studio Guest Designer Post: Flowers




It has been like Christmas since Cheryl at Ten Seconds Studio (TSS) sent me the box with the VerDay Paint and Patina and the metal in it! I have been experimenting to see what I could do and not do with it and what does and doesn't work for me. This week I have been having a lot of fun making flowers and I received a lot of comments about a flower I made to put on a canvas so I decided that today I would share how I made them. I *LOVE* VerDay Paint and Patina and have used it in making flowers from card stock, metal, and on a canvas one that I bought a while back and just doctored up a bit. The first thing you want to decide is what kind of flower, what color of metal you want it to be or look like and what dies or punches you will use to cut it out with. This could turn into a rather lengthy post so grab a cup of coffee while I try to condense it a little by breaking it down into metal or cardstock.

I am lucky to own a Big Shot and a Vagabond die cutting machine and love to use the many dies I have to create fun things. I used Sizzix dies called Flower Layers, Daisies, and Tattered Flowers a Tim Holtz/Sizzix. I used copper and brass sheets and the Flower Layers die to cut this first flower out.

I also used a flower punch from Stampin Up! to cut out a couple smaller flowers using copper but the brass metal sheet was too thick for the punch but worked fine with the dies. The metal flowers can be embossed after cutting with either the molds from TSS or embossing folders. I found embossing them gave the VerDay Patina something to hold on to to get a better oxidization and gave the color depth.
After approximately 24 hours you can take a sanding block and sand the pieces lightly to make the underlying metal shine above the patina. Next you need to take the flower pieces and stack them together securing them with a brad and start forming the petals. The metal that has been embossed has to be manipulated by hand curving and turning it to make the petals to prevent removing the embossing. I also use things like a pencil, chopstick, stylus or whatever to turn the edges over. If you didn't emboss you can use the metal working tools from TSS to turn the petals and give details around the edges and centers.


To make the paper VerDay flowers I painted the bronze and copper paint on white and brown cardstock drying it well before cutting it as I did the metals.


The cardstock will curl as it dries but it is just paper and you can flatten it out using brute force or an iron to straighten it.




Place pieces on a piece of craft foam and using the TSS metal working ball of the ball and cup tool gently use circular motion on the back side of the flower to make the petals curl.



How much curl you want to the petals depends on the size of the ball you use.



Here I just used the erasing tool to curl the center to make a cup to fit the pieces together.






I then lightly sprayed the flower parts with VerDay in a fine mister to start the oxidization process. There is a VerDay Patina Sprayer available from TSS but it has a coarser spray and the flowers need a lighter touch. The next step is to put the pieces together to form the flowers and I hit them with another mist of VerDay and let them sit a day to oxidize.




The canvas flower was easy peasy. I bought the flower a while back and decided to stamp and splotch it with the bronze and copper VerDay Paint and then sprayed it with the VerDay Patina. I hadn’t counted on the Patina causing a slight greenish coloration to the canvas but once it dried and started oxidizing I loved it!



Here are individual pictures of the flowers and what they are made up of. One thing I almost forgot was after the metal, paper, or canvas reaches the color you want it to oxidize to you will need to spray it with a fixative sealer to stop the oxidization.

Canvas with bronze and copper VerDay Paint and VerDay Patina. Unfortunately it doesn't show that greenish cast like the group photo. Trying to photograph and edit these photos was a lesson in patience this week!



Brass flower using Sizzix Flower Die, Brass Metal, VerDay Patina


Copper flower using Sizzix Flower Die, Copper Metal, VerDay Patina.




Another copper metal flower using the Tim Holtz Tattered Flower Die and VerDay Patina.



Copper Daisy using Sizzix Daisy die, copper metal and VerDay Patina.



White cardstock flower made using Bronze VerDay Paint and VerDay Patina. Tim Holtz Tattered Flowers Die.



Brown cardstock using the Bronze VerDay Paint and VerDay Patina. Tim Holtz Tattered Flower die.



I enjoyed playing around with the flowers and if you come back next week you will see what I made with some of them!

14 comments:

  1. Hi Vickie, your flowers are a triumph - I just love them and if I ever find a source for the VerDay paint and patina in the UK I'll give it a try.

    Thanks for popping in on me today. The following link is to our knitting guru, Wendy Poole's instructions on how to make granny squares.

    http://www.wendy-poole.co.uk/page9.php

    She explains very clearly how to set up the square shape.

    Elizabeth x

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    1. Elizabeth TSS will ship them to you. They have smaller bottles now so shipping will be less.

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  2. ...these are just fabby...I loVe the fabric one but loVe them all too...great work...Mel :)

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  3. Wow Vickie, your flowers are absolutely stunning. I cannot believe that we use the exact same dies and come up with such completely different flowers. I really love yours. Your tutorial is very clear so I may just have to have a go at your kind of flower! Thanks for visiting my blog.

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  4. Fabulous metal work. The sheen and the colours are stunning Vicki. Now I'll go and look at the WOYWW post.
    Thanks for sharing such detail. I shall return as they say.
    Smiles,
    Ros.

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  5. Wow! Wow! Wow! I am just loving these flowers!!! I just might have to try out this stuff myself. What kind of fixative are you using on them? Your flowers are just stunning and you can bet I'll be checking back to see what you make with them.

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  6. Vickie, these are terrific! I'm really impressed. I must find out if I can cut metal like this with my Cougar cutting machine - I know I can use it for embossing... Love the finishes you've got. Much more grungey than alcohol inks.

    Well done you.

    Shoshi

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  7. Thanks for stopping by and catching me up on your status. Sounds like the tornadoes were "good" to you.

    I was surprised how similar those two flower dies (Sizzix and Tim Holtz) were. Glad to see them close to each other. And of course, I was so impressed by the embossing, especially since I recently had a chance to make some embossed pieces using my friend Kathy's Big Shot.

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  8. More metallic flowers! Yum, they're gorgeous - you are clever!!
    I'm so glad that you escaped relatively unscathed from all the tornadoes - that must be terrifying when so many roll through. I see that Elizabeth had a load of clearing up to do as well. Hope you and yours are ok.
    Love, LLJ xx

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  9. These look great Vickie, it looks and sounds like you had a load of fun with them - now that is what crafting is all about - playing, discovering, learning...

    I have the TH Sizzix Bigz die that just goes through my cuttlebug - I have cut a few different things with it - handmade papers with silk threads, felt - but I don't think I would chance any metal because I think that would just about be the end of my machine lol...

    Love the vert de gris effect - something I played with many moons ago (14-15 years approx) when I attended a creative paint techniques class. I think I should play again one day.

    enjoy and keep on playing.

    Paula x x x

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  10. Really gorgeous flowers love the techniques and materials you have used x

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I would really love to hear what you think about my art and my posts. Please leave me a comment and let me know! Thanks for visiting my blog. Vickie aka Okienurse